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Exciting times at Dental Studio!

The Dental Studio team cannot wait to reveal our refurbishment project to you.

You have all been so wonderfully patient and supportive whilst this work has been in process, so on behalf of us all, thank you so much.

We at Dental Studio passionately work towards and believe in consistently enhancing our patient experience, this project has been a vision that we have now managed to achieve.

We have invested in this area to include, a relaxing waiting room with refreshment bar, private reception booths, a dedicated smile adviser meeting room and a beautiful training suite.

We will be having an official opening day very soon so we can showcase this and the many amazing treatments we can offer you all.

We will keep you posted!

Best regards always

Barbara
One very proud Business Manager!

Living well

Can gum disease affect your general health?

When you think about problems associated with your dental health, you might typically imagine things like tooth decay, gum disease and bad breath. However, there’s evidence that poor dental health could also be related to some long-term conditions that you may not expect.

Research has shown that gum disease is associated with several other diseases. These include:

heart disease and stroke
diabetes
lung conditions
arthritis
complications in pregnancy

But some of the evidence supporting this research is inconclusive and so professional opinions are split. Here, I’ll explain some of the theories behind the headlines and why it’s thought that dental disease could lead to general health problems.

How could your oral health and overall health be linked?

There are a number of theories as to why the health of your mouth and the rest of your body could be related. To understand these, we first need to understand how gum disease develops.

If you don’t brush and clean between your teeth well enough, bacteria can build up to form a layer known as dental plaque. The build-up of this plaque leads to inflammation of the gums surrounding your teeth, causing them to become swollen and sore, and sometimes to bleed. This is known as gum disease.

Heart disease and stroke

Research has shown that your body may respond to the increase in bacteria in your mouth by producing what are known as inflammatory markers. Having bacteria and inflammatory markers in your bloodstream could contribute to the damage of blood vessels, which supply your heart and brain. This might lead to heart disease and stroke.

Some studies also suggest that treating gum disease might reduce the amount of overall inflammation around your body. It’s thought that this might help to reduce, but not prevent, your chance of developing cardiovascular disease. These findings are yet to be confirmed.

Diabetes

It’s well documented that people with diabetes are at a higher risk of developing gum disease. There’s a relationship between blood sugar levels and the severity of gum disease.

There are a few theories as to why this might be, but largely it’s thought to be due to an inflammatory response around the body (similarly to how gum disease affects the cardiovascular system).

Some research suggests that the relationship between diabetes and gum disease is in fact more of a two-way street than we first thought. This means that not only does having diabetes increase your risk of gum disease, but having gum disease increases your risk of developing diabetes too. However, further research is needed before we can fully understand how these two conditions influence each other.

Lung conditions

Your mouth is the main entrance point to your body, and your airways lead from your mouth to your lungs. So if your mouth contains a lot of bacterial plaque, the theory is that you could then breathe this into your lungs. Once inhaled, bacteria could then go on to cause an infection in your lungs or could aggravate an existing condition, such as pneumonia.

Is gum disease a direct cause or is it all a coincidence?

It’s important to understand the difference between two factors here – causality and association.

Causality means that something is a direct cause of another illness, which is what some of the research around this subject would suggest. In this case, that would imply that gum disease directly causes other diseases.

Association means that having gum disease may not directly cause other long-term diseases, but that the two are closely linked for a number of different reasons. For example, they are both influenced by common risk factors, such as smoking or diet. Therefore, this is an important point to consider, and many medical professionals hold this point of view when it comes to health-related issues.

Common risk factors

It’s important to note that gum disease and long-term illnesses have lots of common causes including age, stress levels and ethnicity. So it’s very difficult to know how significant each factor is and more so, which is the main culprit.

The same goes for the type of lifestyle you lead. It’s thought that if you don’t take care of your general health, for example, by eating a healthy diet, not smoking and doing regular exercise, then you may not be looking after your dental health very much either. For this reason, people who may develop heart disease, stroke, diabetes, lung conditions etc, may also be at an increased risk of developing gum disease, because of the lifestyle choices they make.

Although it’s complex, it’s clear that there’s a link between the health of your mouth and the rest of your body. But it’s not yet certain whether this is a direct cause or merely an association. Because of this, more research is needed.

If there’s one key take home message from what we know so far, it’s this: A good teeth cleaning routine, regular exercise, not smoking, a healthy diet and regular visits to your dentist are vital ingredients to achieve optimal dental and general health.

 

Test your teeth knowledge

There are so many do’s and don’ts out there on dental care for you to digest, so our experts have made things simple. They’ve put together five quick fire question and answers you can get your teeth into.
Is brushing straight after breakfast good for you?
Wait 20-30 minutes for your pH levels to return to normal
Should I rinse after brushing?
No. Leaving the toothpaste on your teeth helps to protect them
How often should I floss?
Once a day
Should I avoid sugar?
Not altogether – try to eat small amounts of sugar at regular intervals
Do whitening toothpastes work?
They help remove stains which brightens your teeth rather than altering the shade

A link between oral health and Alzheimer’s?

A thought provoking article created abit of a stir at Dental Studio recently, both in the practice and on Twitter and Facebook – is there a link between poor oral health and susceptibility to Alzheimer’s?

Gingivitis is a common occurrence, with figures estimating that almost half of the worldwide population have suffered with some form of gingivitis at some point in their life.

What is gingivitis?

Gingivitis occurs where there is a build up of dental plaque. The bacteria present in this plaque can irritate the gums, causing them to become red and inflamed with bleeding on brushing.

Gingivitis can be put right by good oral health – brushing with a toothbrush and toothpaste, cleaning between the teeth with floss or small brushes, and regular hygienist visits can help to remove this plaque build up, getting the teeth back to their pale pink perfection.

However, where the plaque isn’t removed, and the gingivitis left to worsen, the implications become more serious. Gum disease affects 10-15% of the population, and can eventually cause bone loss – meaning that the supporting structure holding the teeth is lost and tooth loss can occur – a problem that becomes alot harder to solve, as well as other issues including pain, bad breath and sensitivity.

 What has really caused some interest is a recent study from the UK, concerning the possibility that bad oral hygiene and the presence of gum disease could contribute towards the deterioration found in the brains of those patients suffering from Alzheimer’s.

 Gum disease has already been found to contribute to the onset of poor health such as heart disease and diabetes.

In this case, the bacteria that is present in the gum disease have been found in the brains of patients suffering with dementia.

Although these finding are in the early stages of the research, it could be an opportune moment for us all to re-focus on our oral health, and the advantages of regular appointments with the dentists and hygienists could help to protect in the future.

If today is the day to make the change, and be proactive to protect your oral health, then give us a call. Recent rule changes means that it is no longer necessary to see the dentist before you can see the hygienist, so book in today!

A White Wedding…

Last week saw the practice participate in a wedding fair at the Portsmouth Guildhall. We went armed with photos, testimonials, leaflets and some obligatory freebies in the shape of tubes of toothpaste, ready to talk to some soon to be brides and grooms about how we can help them to improve their smile for their big day!

What we were excited to see was that it wasn’t just the two leads that wanted to whiten or straighten; it was all members of the bridal party that wanted to look dazzling in the wedding photos.

Whitening and brightening was the order of the day, due to its ease and speed, and the dramatic difference that even just a few days of whitening can create.

At home whitening is an easy to use process; custom made trays are created that fit to each patient’s teeth, and a small amount of gel is placed into the tray which is then fitted around the teeth.

The advantages to this system are that it gives the patient the freedom of when to whiten, during the day or at night, it can fit around your schedule. You are in control as to how white you want to go – whitening has been found to improve the colours of the teeth by up to 13 shades.

 One thing for all to remember…whitening won’t affect the shade of any existing fillings or prosthetics – your crowns and veneers will stay the same shade!

 Good luck to all the brides and grooms that we met this weekend! We hope to see some of you soon!

Dental Studio have various wedding packages catering for all the wedding party – give us a call for more information

Waterlooville – 02392 254234

Chichester – 01243 532992

A beautiful smile using the latest, and least invasive, approach…

For years, patients have been visiting Dental Studio looking for that smile that will bring back confidence lost. Patients complain of missing their smile, hiding their teeth, being embarrassed of the colour, shape or alignment, but also being nervous about the treatment involved in putting things right.

We are proud to be offering a new type of treatment that could solve all of these problems without the need for drilling away tooth surface – a beautiful smile using a minimally invasive process – ABB or Align, Bleach, Bond.

The process is as follows:

It all starts with Alignment, or tooth straightening! Using one of the invisible straightening systems that we have in place – 6 Month Smile, Invisalign, Lingual Braces or Simpli 5 – we straighten the teeth to the perfect position to enhance your new smile.

The second process is the Bleaching – the whitening of the teeth, improving the colour of the teeth by up to 12 shades.

The final stage of the smile makeover is the Bonding section, or the placement of tooth coloured fillings on the front of the teeth. This is less invasive than the placement of veneers, which involves the drilling away of tooth material. These fillings are placed over your original teeth, allowing us to get the perfect shape and shade, without damaging the underlying structure.

No need for veneers, no drilling away of precious tooth, just amazing results.

We are offering this treatment as a package to our patients – please speak to reception for more information on 02392 254234 or 01243 532992.

 

 

 

Welcome to Dental Studio’s blog

Hi all and welcome to our shiny new blog for all things cosmetic dentistry! Not long to wait before we post our first article, so stay tuned and stay in touch!

You can reach us via our facebook page – search “dental studio” or you can find us on twitter – @ourdentalstudio

Looking forward to blogging to you soon!! 😀